February 10, 2014

What To Do If Your I-94 Reads "Not Found"

If you tried to retrieve your I-94 from the cbp.gov online system at:

https://i94.cbp.dhs.gov/I94/request.html

and you receive a response that your I-94 is "Not Found," please review the following checklist to help you check for mistakes and try to enter the information again:

1. Did you enter your first and last name the same way it appears on your Passport? (Do not use dashes or titles.)
2. Did you enter the correct number as your Passport number? (The number is on the upper right hand side of your Passport.)
3. Did you enter your country of citizenship? (The country that issued the Passport, not where you currently live.)
4. Under Class of Admission, did you enter the Visa classification that appears on your U.S. Visa OR if you are traveling under the Visa Waiver program (VWP) enter WT/WB?
5. If you entered your first and middle name and it's not found, try one name or the other. Also try entering your first and middle name in the first name box.
6. Try entering either your most recent date of entry or your original date of entry into the United States.
If you still cannot find your I-94, please contact your nearest Customs and Border Protection Deferred Inspection Site – CBP.gov -- and a CBP Officer will assist you. When you open the link to the Deferred Inspection Site, you will find an alphabetical list of locations within the United States.

Please Note: Asylees and refugees should have received a handwritten or stamped I-94 upon entering the United States and will not be able to retrieve I-94 information online.

-- USCIS website

March 1, 2012

Issuance of L Visas Based on Reciprocity Schedule

The Department of State (DOS) issued a final rule permitting the issuance of L visas with validity periods based on the visa reciprocity schedule which reflects the reciprocal treatment the applicant’s country accords the U.S. Under the current rule, L visas are limited to the petition validity period which is determined by USCIS and currently cannot exceed 3 years. An individual in L status may apply for an extension in increments of up to two years, but the total period of stay may not exceed 5 or 7 years for individuals employed in a specialized knowledge or managerial/executive capacity, respectively. The change in regulation allowing for issuance of full validity L visas based on the visa reciprocity schedule will benefit those who are nationals of countries for which the reciprocity schedule prescribes visa validity for a longer period of time than the initial validity indicated in the petition approved by USCIS and who have extended their L stay while in the United States. As such, these individuals would not be required to apply again for an L visa if they were to travel outside the United States during the period prescribed under the applicable reciprocity schedule, as is currently required when petition validity has been extended. This new rule took effect on February 14, 2012.

November 3, 2011

Chennai Post Takes Over All Blanket L Processing in India

Effective December 1, 2011, all Blanket L visa applications in India will be adjudicated by the U.S. Consulate General in Chennai. The Blanket L category includes intracompany transfers occupying executive and managerial positions, as well as specialized knowledge positions. Previously the U.S. posts in New Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata and Hyderabad were also able to adjudicate applications under the Blanket L category, but now only the post in Chennai has authority to process such applications. However, individual L visas and L dependents may continue to process visas at all the posts in India.