Articles Posted in Citizenship

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USCIS offers a U.S. citizenship on-line resource guide, including citizenship preparation materials and classes for immigrants, teachers, and community-based organizations. For more information on the USCIS Citizenship Resource Center, see http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/menuitem.2182d258012d5eb62b6859c7526e0aa0/?vgnextoid=37decf2351488210VgnVCM1000002
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The USCIS has issued a 16-minute naturalization (U.S. citizenship) video for applicants, which includes information about eligibility requirements, the application process, the interview and the required tests. To see the video, please visit this link: http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/menuitem.5af9bb95919f35e66f614176543f6d1a/?vgnextoid=76574bbe6cb97210VgnVCM100000082ca60aRCRD&vgnextchannel=d6369ddf801b3210VgnVCM100000b92ca60aRCRD.

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The U.S. passport agency in San Francisco, California, is joining passport agencies around the country in holding an event on 03/27/2010 from 10AM – 3PM to provide current and prospective U.S. citizens passport information and to accept passport applications. The San Francisco Passport Agency is located at 95 Hawthorne Street, 5th Floor, San Francisco, California 94105. If you’d like information about U.S. passport requirements and the application, please visit travel.state.gov or call 1-877-487-2778. Please note that you do not need to pre-register for U.S. passport day.

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50 new individuals become naturalized U.S. citizens March 1, 2010 in a special ceremony at the Robert F. Kennedy Department of Justice’s Great Hall. In light of this special ceremony, the U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS) has published the following citizenship statistics:

1907: 7,941 individuals naturalized 1908: 25,975 individuals naturalized 1971-1980: 1.5 million individuals naturalized (main areas were Europe, Philippines, Cuba and China)

1981-1990: 2.3 million individuals naturalized (main areas were Asia, Canada and Mexico)

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The DHS Secretary Janet Napolitano announced January 15, 2010 that the citizenship process for men and women defending the U.S. has been streamlined by a new law amending former DHS regulations. This new law reduces the time requirements for naturalization through U.S. military service from 3 years to 1 year for applicants who served during peacetime. The law also extends benefits to members of the Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve of the U.S. Armed Forces. Members who have served honorably in active-duty status or in the Selected Reserve for any time since 09/11/2001, can file for citizenship immediately. In an effort to increase efficiency and honor those defending the U.S., the new law also eliminates the need for military members to provide certain redundant biographic information with their citizenship applications.

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