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USCIS has failed to print approximately 50,000 green cards and 75,000 EADs for some family-based, employment-based, and asylum-based immigrant applications that have already been approved. Printing of the physical cards has been significantly delayed because the agency is operating with reduced printing capacity.

USCIS shut down its Kentucky printing center and scaled back printing at its only other facility, in Missouri. USCIS failed to renew its printing contract and did not disclose the decision to Congress. Reporting suggests that the agency planned to insource document printing but could not maintain normal capacity due to a hiring freeze.

More information on the green card and EAD delay can be found here. Further reporting on the underlying financial issues impacting USCIS’s printing capacity is available here.

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You can view the visa bulletin here:  https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/legal/visa-law0/visa-bulletin/2020/visa-bulletin-for-august-2020.html

Contact our office if you have any questions about preference categories or dates for filing and final action. Our email is provided at the end of this post.

Employment based preferences must use the Final Action Dates chart. The employment-based categories are as follows: EB-1 is current for all countries except China (February 8, 2018) and India (February 8, 2018); EB-2 is current for all countries except China (January 15, 2016) and India (July 8, 2009); EB-3 is April 1, 2019 for all countries except China (February 15, 2017) and India (October 1, 2009); EB-3 Other Workers is April 1, 2019 for all countries except China (August 1, 2008) and India (October  1, 2009). EB-4 are current for all countries except El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras (April 1, 2017) and Mexico (June 15, 2018); Religious Worker visas are current for all countries except El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras (April 1, 2017) and Mexico (June 15, 2018); EB-5 non-regional centers are current for all countries except China (August 8, 2015) and Vietnam (July 22, 2017); EB-5 regional centers are current for all countries except China (August 8, 2015) and Vietnam (July 22, 2017).

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On June 22, 2020, The President signed a Proclamation suspending and limiting the entry of any individual seeking entry pursuant to the following nonimmigrant visas:

  1. an H-1B or H-2B visa, and any individual accompanying or following to join such individual;
  2. a J visa, to the extent the individual is participating in an intern, trainee, teacher, camp counselor, au pair, or summer work travel program, and any individual accompanying or following to join such individual; and
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The visa bulletin is out at this link:  July 2020 Visa Bulletin   

Employment based preferences must use the Final Action Dates chart. The employment-based categories are as follows: EB-1 is current for all countries except China (August 22, 2017) and India (May 8, 2017); EB-2 is current for all countries except China (November 8, 2015) and India (July 8, 2009); EB-3 is April 15, 2018 for all countries except China (June 22, 2016) and India (June 1, 2009); EB-3 Other Workers is April 15, 2018 for all countries except China (July 22, 2008) and India (June 1, 2009). EB-4 are current for all countries except El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras (February 1, 2017) and Mexico (June 15, 2018); Religious Worker visas are current for all countries except El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras (February 1, 2017) and Mexico (June 15, 2018); EB-5 non-regional centers are current for all countries except China (July 22, 2015) and Vietnam (May 15, 2017); EB-5 regional centers are current for all countries except China (July 22, 2015) and Vietnam (May 15, 2017).

Family based petitions are backlogged, however the F2A category is current in the Final Action Dates. USCIS says that applicants in the F2A category may file using the Final Action Dates Chart for July 2020.

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U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced that it will resume premium processing for Form I-129, Petition for a Nonimmigrant Worker and Form I-140, Immigrant Petition for Alien Workers, in phases over the month of June.

Here are the dates and types of cases for which Premium Processing can be requested.

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Immigrants have long enlisted in all branches of the U.S. military, beginning with the Revolutionary War. According to an article published by Migration Policy Institution (MPI), a leading institution in the field of migration policy and a source of authoritative research and analysis, the current number of veterans who were born outside the United States stands at approximately 530,000, representing 3 percent of all 18.6 million veterans nationwide. We would like to provide this article from MPI that provides information on the population of immigrant veterans in the United States.

Please contact immigrationinfo@cornerlaw.com if you have any questions.

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Immigrants make up significant shares of the U.S. workforce in a range of industries. As workers, business owners, taxpayers, and neighbors, immigrants are an integral part of the country’s diverse and thriving communities and make extensive contributions that benefit all.

We would like to provide this fact sheet from the American Immigration Council (AIC) that highlights key facts about the current state of  U.S. immigration. AIC is a nonprofit organization and advocacy group that advocates for immigrants to the United States. Please find AIC official website here.

Please contact immigrationinfo@cornerlaw.com if you have any questions.

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On March 20, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) announced an extension of flexibility in rules related to Form I-9  Employment Eligibility Verification compliance due to COVID-19. The original guidance was set to expire on May 19. Due to the continued precautions related to COVID-19, DHS has extended this policy for an additional 30 days.

For more information on how to obtain, remotely inspect, and retain copies of the identity and employment eligibility documents to complete Section 2 of Form I-9, please see the original guidance. The original guidance including eligibility requirements can be found here.

This provision only applies to employers and workplaces that are operating remotely.

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U.S Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced on May 6, 2020, that it recently migrated to Microsoft 365 and that, as of April 24, it is unable to receive and answer emails sent to e-verify@dhs.gov and i-9central@dhs.gov.

Per USCIS’s notice, if you sent an email to these addresses on or after April 24 and have not received a response within 48 hours, please resend your message to the email addresses below:

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In light of April 22nd  Executive Order that currently bans many individuals seeking to enter the U.S. as immigrants, we would like to provide this fact sheet from the American Immigration Council that distinguishes the difference between nonimmigrant and immigrant employment based visa classifications and outlines basic information about how the employment-based U.S. immigration system works.

Please contact immigrationinfo@cornerlaw.com if you have any questions about employment-based visa classifications in the U.S.

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